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[ANSWERED] Listed below are the three most challenging interview questions you may experience during the interview process

Listed below are the three most challenging interview questions you may experience during the interview process. To fully prepare the student for his or her future interview, please provide a clear and concise answer as to how you as the APRN will answer each interview question.

1-What is your biggest Weakness?

2-Describe how you resolved conflict with a co-worker or patient?

3-Tell me about yourself?

Please answer each questions by separated and at least 3 references.

Expert Answer and Explanation

Answering Interview Questions

As an Advanced Practice Registered Nurse (APRN), I have weakness especially when it comes to working in a team setting. I particularly tend to lose patience whenever I work in the company of colleagues as we discuss and implement ideas pertaining to the advancement of the clinical objectives. I often have a feeling that I am a well-informed person, and for this reason, I tend to feel that any view that contradicts mine is misguided (Jerng et al., 2017). This is why I always want other members in my team to listen to what I have to say, and take my perspective into consideration when making resolutions. As a self-sufficient person, I am less likely to depend on the other parties in my team because I have a strong conviction that I can effectively and sufficiently manage most of the clinical tasks (Babiker et al., 2014) Because of this attitude, there is a possibility that I may not relate well with colleagues while working in a team environment (Rosen et al., 2018).

Whenever I disagree with a co-worker, I make efforts to see that I collaboratively work with them to resolve the disagreement. One of the steps I would take to address the conflict is taking colleague aside and discussing with them the issue that caused the conflict. Again, I take time to listen to what the co-worker would say, and understand their concerns or fears. By getting to know what the colleague thinks about the incident concerning the disagreement, I engage them in a constructive manner so that we work together to determine solution to the conflict (Tan & Manca, 2013). I take into consideration, their concerns when making decisions on how to resolve the issue, and this helps strengthen my relationship with colleagues at the workplace (Caesens et al.,2019).

References

Babiker, A., El Husseini, M., Al Nemri, A., Al Frayh, A., Al Juryyan, N., Faki, M. O., Assiri, A., Al Saadi, M., Shaikh, F., & Al Zamil, F. (2014). Health care professional development: Working as a team to improve patient care. Sudanese journal of paediatrics14(2), 9–16.Retrived from https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4949805/.

Caesens, G., Stinglhamber, F., Demoulin, S., De Wilde, M., & Mierop, A. (2019). Perceived Organizational Support and Workplace Conflict: The Mediating Role of Failure-Related Trust. Frontiers in psychology9, 2704.Doi: https://doi.org/10.3389/fpsyg.2018.02704.

Jerng, J. S., Huang, S. F., Liang, H. W., Chen, L. C., Lin, C. K., Huang, H. F., Hsieh, M. Y., & Sun, J. S. (2017). Workplace interpersonal conflicts among the healthcare workers: Retrospective exploration from the institutional incident reporting system of a university-affiliated medical center. PloS one12(2), e0171696. Doi: https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0171696.

Rosen, M. A., DiazGranados, D., Dietz, A. S., Benishek, L. E., Thompson, D., Pronovost, P. J., & Weaver, S. J. (2018). Teamwork in healthcare: Key discoveries enabling safer, high-quality care. The American psychologist73(4), 433–450. Doi: https://doi.org/10.1037/amp0000298.

Tan, A., & Manca, D. (2013). Finding common ground to achieve a “good death”: family physicians working with substitute decision-makers of dying patients. A qualitative grounded theory study. BMC family practice14, 14.Doi: https://doi.org/10.1186/1471-2296-14-14.

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